School for Syrian kids (Part 1): Always enough

13 Jan, 2016 | Near East
Nicole James
One woman sacrificially advocates for and educates marginalized Syrian children in her village. 
Photo by Jordan Armstrong

Miraculous provision

After two years of hinting that it was time to leave the country where they had been living, Diana’s* husband suddenly relocated the family to the Near East, where he was originally from. Although they had a small flat to live in, the space was empty. For more than six months, Diana, her husband, and their five kids slept on the floor.

Finally, Diana decided to start looking at appliances. One Saturday, she picked out a refrigerator and stove at a local shop, but because of their cost she didn’t purchase the items. “We are waiting,” she told the owner. “Maybe in a few months we will come back.”

Monday morning, the shop owner pulled up to Diana’s house and delivered the refrigerator and stove she had chosen.

“It was known that this man is very greedy,” Diana said. “So all our neighbours were amazed [at] what happened… I was excited, and I said, ‘Lord, thank You. This is Your finger.’”

Some time later, an acquaintance called Diana’s husband to tell them about a used car for sale, wanting the couple to go look at the vehicle. “No, I didn’t get my money yet. I should not go yet,” her husband replied.

“No, no, let’s just go see it,” the friend insisted. They went, and they liked it. Still, Diana and her husband lacked the means to purchase the vehicle. Again, God intervened.

“It will not stay in my home today,” the man insisted, giving them the key. “Take it.”

“It was like that in everything,” Diana remembered. In the country where her family had lived before, she said her children had suffered through school, isolated and belittled by teachers and students alike. In the Near East, someone suggested putting her kids into one of the top English schools in their area. “When we went to pay, even for the notebooks, they said, ‘I don’t want you to pay for anything,’” Diana recalled. Tuition fees were also covered, secretly, by a man who wasn’t a believer. “It’s clear this was God’s hand.”

Always enough

During the same time that Diana was experiencing God’s miraculous care for her family’s larger needs, she was also meticulously counting their remaining money and purchasing a few staple supplies to stock her cupboards.

Living in a village to which many Syrian refugees had fled, she began visiting the displaced families around her, several of whom were living in tents.

“I felt empathy," she shared. "I saw they left their houses, as I left our villa, too. They left their people…and I left my family. I felt like we have the same situation,” she described. The only difference, Diana continued, was that as a believer she knew God would provide, and they didn’t.

One family of nine especially touched Diana. They had nothing, and like Diana’s family had done in the beginning, they were practically sleeping on the floor. Although she was afraid that giving them food would jeopardize her ability to feed her own family that night, Diana opened her cupboard and sacrificed her stores.

“Lord, You’re faithful. I will give,” she prayed. She continued to give the family food, trying not to notice how much she had left for her own children. After awhile, however, she told her husband that they were not running out of food. “It’s not finishing anymore. I don’t know how it happens. This is the grace of God, really. I always have enough to give and enough for our family.”

“God put His hand and He blessed us,” she explained. “Because if you take your pencil and paper and counted what you have and what you are giving, and after days it’s still there, you can’t understand this.”

Praise God for His miraculous provision and faithfulness. Pray that believers in the Near East, like Diana, would give generously and sacrificially to others, showing them God’s love.

“Always enough” is Part 1 of Diana’s story. Read Part 2: “Let the children come.”

*Name changed

Nicole James is a journalist, ESL teacher, and adventurer. As a writer for OM Middle East North Africa, she’s passionate about publishing the stories of God’s works among the nations, telling people about the wonderful things He is doing in the world.

Credit: Nicole James · © 2016 OM International This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

OM’s role in the Church is to mobilise people to share the knowledge of Jesus and His love with every generation in every nation. OM pioneers and leads initiatives to redeem lives, rebuild communities and restore hope in over 110 countries.

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